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“All-over” patterns have fairly closely spaced motifs that are evenly distributed.  This is a lovely example of that, with the large flowers having an elegant curve to the stems and a directional orientation that might give a striped effect, except for the perfect placement and bi-directional nature of the other floral and leaf elements.  The overall effect is both timeless and non-directional. This pattern is particularly adaptable for custom floorcloths.


This pattern from The Stencil Library has intrigued us for a while.  The all-over design with the elegantly angled leaves, sweet flower heads, and berries forming a series of diamonds creates a lovely field.


This design is based on a ceiling pattern in the 1889 Robert Graves Co. Wallpaper Catalog.  Ceiling patterns are often great rug patterns as they are non-directional and have solved the “corner problem”.  Often when adapting designs from other sources, how the design turns a 90-degree angle was not figured out as it did not need to be.  With ceiling designs, it has and often the corners are the most elaborate part of the design, as in this case.  This is one of the loveliest ceiling patterns we have come across.


Another visionary Dresser design.  This one has a decidedly deco form and creates a marvelous tiled effect, with many layers that allow for multiple opportunities for palette exploration.  The combination of elements results in stars, squares, rays of light, wings, and fleur de lis. 

 


This pattern masterfully integrates Greek Key, geometric floral and stylized Fleur de Lis motifs into a compelling design.  It is rare to have a Greek Key element that is not part of a border design, or, occasionally, an all-over design.  This one treats the Greek Key as an individual motif.


The effect of this pattern when repeated is to create a series of connected diamonds, with flowers at their points or the pattern can be read such that the flowers are in the center of the diamond pattern, depending on how the palette is employed. We have explored several different custom floorcloth shapes and sizes with this pattern and look forward to additional palette exploration.


This design is based on a wallpaper pattern, c. 1886, from the A.W.P.M.A. (American Wallpaper Manufacturer’s Association) and attributed to M.H. Birge and Sons, the premier American wallpaper manufacturer of the time.  This paper is in Bolling & Company’s portfolio, the largest collection of antique American wallpaper in private hands.  AGD’s co-owner, Gwen Jones, is also a co-owner of Bolling & Company and intends to mine their archives for other suitable patterns to adapt for floorcloths.  This one was top of the list!


This is a terrific border pattern which has strong geometric leanings and a somewhat whimsical leaf pattern. 


This poppy pattern is taken from Plate XXXVII in Christopher Dresser's "Studies in Design", c. 1875.  The description of the plate is "Sheet of powerdings, adapted for wall-ornaments."  Well, off to the dictionary to learn that powderings are (in this context) "Decoration by means of numerous small figures, usually the same figure often repeated."  We originally turned this motif into a stencil for a wall ornament for a client's kitchen.  


This pattern is from The Stencil Library, a great source for a wide variety of stencils in varying styles.  We choose this one for its arts & crafts bent and look forward to trying it with different placements of the tiles and assorted palettes.


This pattern is based on a series of classic European stencils from the early 1900s designed for ceilings.  Great ceiling designs are often great rug designs.  The scrolling pattern and floral motifs are lovely and the set includes a center medallion, corners, and side stencils all incorporating the same decorative elements.