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“All-over” patterns have fairly closely spaced motifs that are evenly distributed.  This is a lovely example of that, with the large flowers having an elegant curve to the stems and a directional orientation that might give a striped effect, except for the perfect placement and bi-directional nature of the other floral and leaf elements.  The overall effect is both timeless and non-directional. This pattern is particularly adaptable for custom floorcloths.


This Early American pattern set is from the Esther Brazer Stevens Collection at the Museum of American Folk Art.  Brazer Stevens recorded authentic stencil patterns, including this one from the Edward Durant House in Newton, MA, c. 1734.  The lovely diamond pattern is well complemented by the floral border. 


This pattern masterfully integrates Greek Key, geometric floral and stylized Fleur de Lis motifs into a compelling design.  It is rare to have a Greek Key element that is not part of a border design, or, occasionally, an all-over design.  This one treats the Greek Key as an individual motif.


The effect of this pattern when repeated is to create a series of connected diamonds, with flowers at their points or the pattern can be read such that the flowers are in the center of the diamond pattern, depending on how the palette is employed. We have explored several different custom floorcloth shapes and sizes with this pattern and look forward to additional palette exploration.


This pattern is from The Stencil Library, a great source for a wide variety of stencils in varying styles.  We choose this one for its arts & crafts bent and look forward to trying it with different placements of the tiles and assorted palettes.