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This Early American pattern set is from the Esther Brazer Stevens Collection at the Museum of American Folk Art.  Brazer Stevens recorded authentic stencil patterns, including this one from the Edward Durant House in Newton, MA, c. 1734.  The lovely diamond pattern is well complemented by the floral border. 


This floorcloth is based on a pattern from The Stencil Library, a venerable stencil source based in the UK.  The pattern forms a lattice of roses. 

This pattern is based on two different wallpaper designs from the Robert Graves Co. Wallpaper Company, c. 1880s.  The interior motifs with their whimsical circles of leaves and berries are from Bolling & Company's remarkable wallpaper archive.  The border pattern is based on a depiction of a ceiling border in a Graves wallpaper catalog.  The two patterns combine beautifully to create stunning floorcloths.


This pattern is a classic Harlequin design, with an elongated diamond - often used in traditional floorcloth making. 

 


This Early American pattern is from the Esther Brazer Stevens Collection at the Museum of American Folk Art.  Brazer Stevens recorded authentic stencil patterns, including this one from the Humphries House in Dorchester, MA, c.1800.


Interlocking circle patterns are found in historical artifacts from the 7th century BC onwards – one of the most enduring decorative forms found in almost all cultures throughout history.  This pattern was found on a painted floor in the Isaac Buck House in Connecticut, c1800, and is a wonderful example of a timeless version of interlocking circles.


This floorcloth is based on an ornate floral damask design that creates a trellis effect.  The border is an organic leaf and berry motif, deliberately given a worn effect, and the corners are hand-painted fruits based on carvings on the buffet in the room where this floorcloth resides. 


This lovely all-over floral pattern that is organic in its execution, creating a carpet of blooms, buds, and leaves.


This is a rare pure geometric pattern from Christopher Dresser.   It is another design that just begs to be used as a floorcloth pattern.  We more or less retained the original palette for our first effort on this one because the Dresser palette is just so good.  We look forward to exploring many palettes with this great design.